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LS Art Show Preview, 2/22-2/23

LREI
The Lower School Art Show is a time for children to share with the wider LREI community the results of dynamic experiences they've had with materials in art, shop and early childhood classrooms.
By using their fingers and hands, children shape materials to express their thinking. They feel the textures of collage fabrics, the “gooeyness” of paper maché, the plasticity of clay and the resistance of wood. Getting an idea, using one's imagination, problem solving, flexibility when faced with a "mistake" and delight when something comes out exactly the way one wants it are integral to the art process.
 
The paintings, collages, drawings, 3-d paper mâché sculptures and puppets, wooden chests and wooden spoons, animals and flora of Manahatta in paper mâché and models of early 20th century immigrants living on the Lower East Side created by the Fours to the Fourth Grade exhibited in the Lower School Art Show reflect our belief that art making for children is a visual expression of their thinking and feeling. The artworks are both individual and collaborative. Labels describing the works are written or dictated by the children. Questions that motivate the artworks are included.

During the Lower School Art Show, children come in class or buddy groups to look at and discuss the artworks. "Museum Guides" will speak about a class exhibit and answer questions. At the end of the visit one class may sit down and respond to the other class's work or talk about what they noticed in the art show.

At each age the artworks the children create express their unique visual response to their world. The Lower School Art Show celebrates this.
 
We invite everyone to come and enjoy the Lower School Art Show.
 
P.S. Each time your child brings home art from school you have the opportunity to enjoy your own child’s art show. How you talk with your child about their work can impact the experience for both of you. For ideas about how to initiate conversation about your child's artwork, download, "How to Talk With Children About Their Art Work."

-Lower School Art Teacher, Ann Schaumburger.
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